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Counting Steps in Activities of Daily Living in People With a Chronic Disease Using Nine Commercially Available Fitness Trackers: Cross-Sectional Validity Study

Counting Steps in Activities of Daily Living in People With a Chronic Disease Using Nine Commercially Available Fitness Trackers: Cross-Sectional Validity Study

IntroductionThe use of activity tracking to self-monitor physical activity is gaining popularity. In 2015, 1 out of 3 Dutch inhabitants was using apps, wearables, or activity trackers [1].

Darcy Ummels, Emmylou Beekman, Kyra Theunissen, Susy Braun, Anna J Beurskens

JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2018;6(4):e70


Physical Activity Assessment Using an Activity Tracker in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Axial Spondyloarthritis: Prospective Observational Study

Physical Activity Assessment Using an Activity Tracker in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Axial Spondyloarthritis: Prospective Observational Study

Mobile activity trackers, such as smartwatches or “connected bracelets” (Withings, FitBit, Jawbone, and MisFit), allow both an interactive feedback on physical activity and the visualization of the evolution of precised activity patterns over time [17].

Charlotte Jacquemin, Hervé Servy, Anna Molto, Jérémie Sellam, Violaine Foltz, Frédérique Gandjbakhch, Christophe Hudry, Stéphane Mitrovic, Bruno Fautrel, Laure Gossec

JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2018;6(1):e1


When More Than Exercise Is Needed to Increase Chances of Aging in Place: Qualitative Analysis of a Telehealth Physical Activity Program to Improve Mobility in Low-Income Older Adults

When More Than Exercise Is Needed to Increase Chances of Aging in Place: Qualitative Analysis of a Telehealth Physical Activity Program to Improve Mobility in Low-Income Older Adults

Compernolle et al [7] integrated pedometers and an internet-based PA program for adults at risk for chronic medical problems and found step counts and a computer-based intervention led to more accurate PA reports [7].Activity trackers can increase PA when used

Kathy VanRavenstein, Boyd H Davis

JMIR Aging 2018;1(2):e11955


Effects of Mobile Health Including Wearable Activity Trackers to Increase Physical Activity Outcomes Among Healthy Children and Adolescents: Systematic Review

Effects of Mobile Health Including Wearable Activity Trackers to Increase Physical Activity Outcomes Among Healthy Children and Adolescents: Systematic Review

Some preliminary data suggest that wearable activity trackers may have the potential to increase activity levels through self-monitoring and goal setting in the short term [14].

Birgit Böhm, Svenja D Karwiese, Harald Böhm, Renate Oberhoffer

JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2019;7(4):e8298


Effectiveness of Wearable Trackers on Physical Activity in Healthy Adults: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

Effectiveness of Wearable Trackers on Physical Activity in Healthy Adults: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

IntroductionWearable activity trackers have rapidly emerged in the past decade as consumer devices to support self-monitoring of physical activity [1,2].

Matilda Swee Sun Tang, Katherine Moore, Andrew McGavigan, Robyn A Clark, Anand N Ganesan

JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2020;8(7):e15576


Can a Free Wearable Activity Tracker Change Behavior? The Impact of Trackers on Adults in a Physician-Led Wellness Group

Can a Free Wearable Activity Tracker Change Behavior? The Impact of Trackers on Adults in a Physician-Led Wellness Group

IntroductionThe aim of this pilot research is to investigate the use of wearable activity trackers (trackers) by primarily older adults with chronic medical conditions who have never used trackers previously.

Lisa Gualtieri, Sandra Rosenbluth, Jeffrey Phillips

JMIR Res Protoc 2016;5(4):e237


Activity Trackers Implement Different Behavior Change Techniques for Activity, Sleep, and Sedentary Behaviors

Activity Trackers Implement Different Behavior Change Techniques for Activity, Sleep, and Sedentary Behaviors

devices (smartphone or tablets) and wearable technology such as wrist worn activity trackers, now have increasingly sophisticated capabilities to capture, analyze, and provide feedback to users on their daily physical activity, sleep, and sedentary behaviors

Mitch Duncan, Beatrice Murawski, Camille E Short, Amanda L Rebar, Stephanie Schoeppe, Stephanie Alley, Corneel Vandelanotte, Morwenna Kirwan

Interact J Med Res 2017;6(2):e13