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Currently submitted to: JMIR Formative Research

Date Submitted: Oct 23, 2020
(currently open for review)

Warning: This is an author submission that is not peer-reviewed or edited. Preprints - unless they show as "accepted" - should not be relied on to guide clinical practice or health-related behavior and should not be reported in news media as established information.

Feasibility and acceptability of a digital intervention to support shared decision making in children and young people’s mental health: A mixed methods pilot randomised controlled trial

  • Shaun Liverpool; 
  • Julian Edbrooke-Childs

ABSTRACT

Background:

Interventions to involve parents in children and young people’s mental health (CYPMH) decisions are associated with positive outcomes. However, appropriately planning effectiveness studies is critical to ensure meaningful evidence is collected. It is important to conduct pilot studies to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention itself, and the feasibility of the protocol to test effectiveness.

Objective:

This paper report the findings from a feasibility and acceptability study of Power Up for Parents (PUfP), an intervention to promote shared decision making (SDM) and support parents and carers making CYPMH decisions.

Methods:

A mixed methods study design was adopted. Stage one, healthcare professionals and parents provided feedback on acceptability, usefulness and suggestions for further development. Stage two was a multi-centre, three-arm, individual and cluster randomised controlled, pilot feasibility trial with parents accessing CYPMH services. Outcome measures collected data on demographics, participation rates, SDM, satisfaction and parents’ anxiety. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. Google Analytics estimates were used to report engagement with the prototype. Outcomes from both stages were tested against a published set of criteria for proceeding to a randomised control trial (RCT).

Results:

Despite evidence suggesting the acceptability of PUfP, the findings suggest that recruitment modifications are needed to enhance the feasibility of collecting follow-up data, before scaling up to a fully powered RCT. Based on the Go-No-Go criteria, only 50% of sites recruited and collected baseline data, while 38% of parents completed follow-up measures. Nonetheless, healthcare professionals and parents generally accessed and used the intervention. Themes describing “appearance and functionality”, “perceived need and general helpfulness”, “accessibility and appropriateness” and “a wish list for improvement” emerged providing valuable information to inform future development and refinement of the intervention.

Conclusions:

Owing to the high attrition observed in the trial, proceeding directly to a full RCT may not be feasible with the current protocol. Nonetheless, with some minor adjustments to the recruitment strategies and upgrade to the intervention, this pilot study provides a platform for future evaluations of PUfP. Clinical Trial: ISRCTN Registry ISRCTN39238984


 Citation

Please cite as:

Liverpool S, Edbrooke-Childs J

Feasibility and acceptability of a digital intervention to support shared decision making in children and young people’s mental health: A mixed methods pilot randomised controlled trial

JMIR Preprints. 23/10/2020:25235

URL: https://preprints.jmir.org/preprint/25235

Per the author's request the PDF is not available.